1. New York and Brooklyn from Michael_Novakhov (110 sites): “Brooklyn College” – Google News: City increases efforts to ensure measles vaccinations ahead of Passover holiday – News 12 Brooklyn

City increases efforts to ensure measles vaccinations ahead of Passover holiday  News 12 Brooklyn

With Passover now a week away, the city continues to increase efforts to ensure people get the measles vaccine.

“Brooklyn College” – Google News

1. New York and Brooklyn from Michael_Novakhov (110 sites)

The Global Security News: “james b. comey” – Google News: On Politics: Julian Assange, Now in Custody, Faces U.S. Hacking Charge – The New York Times

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April 12, 2019
“james b. comey” – Google News: On Politics: Julian Assange, Now in Custody, Faces U.S. Hacking Charge – The New York Times
“house judiciary committee” – Google News: Black holes and Congress’ accomplishments at 100 days – Fox News
“fbi scandal” – Google News: Week In The News: Assange Arrested, Security Shakeups, AG Barr And More – WBUR
Alerta de Google: fbi counterintelligence: Unraveling Three Key Russian Collusion Hoax Plot Lines

“james b. comey” – Google News: On Politics: Julian Assange, Now in Custody, Faces U.S. Hacking Charge – The New York Times

FBI from Michael_Novakhov (25 sites)
On Politics: Julian Assange, Now in Custody, Faces U.S. Hacking Charge The New York TimesThe WikiLeaks founder empowered a generation of whistle-blowers, but he was a highly problematic champion for press freedom and the public’s right to know.
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“house judiciary committee” – Google News: Black holes and Congress’ accomplishments at 100 days – Fox News

FBI from Michael_Novakhov (25 sites)
Black holes and Congress’ accomplishments at 100 days Fox NewsAstronomers announced this week they finally observed what Albert Einstein hypothesized decades ago: a black hole. A black hole is an abyss of oblivion.
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“fbi scandal” – Google News: Week In The News: Assange Arrested, Security Shakeups, AG Barr And More – WBUR

FBI from Michael_Novakhov (25 sites)
Week In The News: Assange Arrested, Security Shakeups, AG Barr And More WBURJulian Assange arrested. A purge in Homeland Security. An Attorney General, grilled. A big vote in Israel.
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Alerta de Google: fbi counterintelligence: Unraveling Three Key Russian Collusion Hoax Plot Lines

FBI from Michael_Novakhov (25 sites)
Some powerful forces converged: the Department of Justice, the FBI, … between now disgraced FBI counterintelligence chief Peter Strzok and FBI … Alerta de Google: fbi counterintelligence
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Sites from Michael_Novakhov (21 sites): The Global Security News: 1. US Security from Michael_Novakhov (87 sites): Washington Free Beacon: ‘The Walking Dead’ Likely to Receive Virginia Tax Subsidy

Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam said Monday that “The Walking Dead” will film the debut of its upcoming offshoot series in Virginia and that the film will be eligible for a tax subsidy.

The AMC original show can earn this tax subsidy through a Virginia film tax credit. The total amount of the subsidy will be determined based on how many Virginians are hired, how many local goods and services are used and deliverables, which includes tourism promotion.

“We are delighted to welcome AMC back to Virginia,” Northam said in a news release. “The series will provide high-paying jobs for our skilled workers and will invite economic opportunity for Virginia businesses large and small. Uniquely, the series also brings with it a devoted global fan-base, creating immeasurable added value for the Commonwealth as the franchise’s powerful spotlight shines on Virginia.”

According to the news release, tourists spent $25 billion in Virginia, which supported nearly a quarter-million jobs and brought the state $1.73 billion in tax revenue.

“We’re thrilled that the Dead will keep walking into a new corner of the post-apocalyptic world, a corner that will present stories and characters unlike any that The Walking Dead has dramatized thus far, and that is bound to excite one of the most passionate fan bases in television,” David Madden, the president of programming for AMC Networks and AMC Studios, said in a news release.

Critics of tax subsidies say they amount to government picking winners and losers and argue that states with overall pro-jobs tax structures shouldn’t need subsidies.

The filming of 10 episodes in Virginia will begin this summer and the AMC debut will air in 2020.

“The Walking Dead” first aired nine seasons on AMC beginning in 2010, with 131 episodes. The franchise has also two spinoffs: “Fear of the Walking Dead” and “The Talking Dead.”

The post ‘The Walking Dead’ Likely to Receive Virginia Tax Subsidy appeared first on Washington Free Beacon.

Washington Free Beacon

1. US Security from Michael_Novakhov (87 sites)

The Global Security News

Sites from Michael_Novakhov (21 sites)

Sites from Michael_Novakhov (21 sites): The Brooklyn Bridge: The Global Security News: 1. US Security from Michael_Novakhov (87 sites): Washington Free Beacon: ‘The Walking Dead’ Likely to Receive Virginia Tax Subsidy

Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam said Monday that “The Walking Dead” will film the debut of its upcoming offshoot series in Virginia and that the film will be eligible for a tax subsidy.

The AMC original show can earn this tax subsidy through a Virginia film tax credit. The total amount of the subsidy will be determined based on how many Virginians are hired, how many local goods and services are used and deliverables, which includes tourism promotion.

“We are delighted to welcome AMC back to Virginia,” Northam said in a news release. “The series will provide high-paying jobs for our skilled workers and will invite economic opportunity for Virginia businesses large and small. Uniquely, the series also brings with it a devoted global fan-base, creating immeasurable added value for the Commonwealth as the franchise’s powerful spotlight shines on Virginia.”

According to the news release, tourists spent $25 billion in Virginia, which supported nearly a quarter-million jobs and brought the state $1.73 billion in tax revenue.

“We’re thrilled that the Dead will keep walking into a new corner of the post-apocalyptic world, a corner that will present stories and characters unlike any that The Walking Dead has dramatized thus far, and that is bound to excite one of the most passionate fan bases in television,” David Madden, the president of programming for AMC Networks and AMC Studios, said in a news release.

Critics of tax subsidies say they amount to government picking winners and losers and argue that states with overall pro-jobs tax structures shouldn’t need subsidies.

The filming of 10 episodes in Virginia will begin this summer and the AMC debut will air in 2020.

“The Walking Dead” first aired nine seasons on AMC beginning in 2010, with 131 episodes. The franchise has also two spinoffs: “Fear of the Walking Dead” and “The Talking Dead.”

The post ‘The Walking Dead’ Likely to Receive Virginia Tax Subsidy appeared first on Washington Free Beacon.

Washington Free Beacon

1. US Security from Michael_Novakhov (87 sites)

The Global Security News

The Brooklyn Bridge

Sites from Michael_Novakhov (21 sites)

Sites from Michael_Novakhov (21 sites): The Global Security News: 1. US Security from Michael_Novakhov (87 sites): Washington Free Beacon: ‘The Best of Enemies,’ ‘The Highwaymen’ Reviews

Why do we go to the movies? Strike that: Why do we use that locution, “to the movies”? Movie theaters are the physical locations to which we are going, after all. The phrasing itself is a bit anachronistic in the age of Netflix and Hulu and Prime and the Criterion Channel and Shudder and Vudu: the movies seem to come to us as much as we go to them.

Yet, go we do, even if we don’t go to movies like The Best of Enemies as much as we might have in years past. It’s a passé sort of picture, a liberal message movie about the ills of racism and the ways in which we can join together to improve our world. The theorists and the scolds do not care for it because it runs afoul of various sensibilities. The film seems more interested in its white protagonist, a Klan leader opposed to integration named C.P. Ellis (Sam Rockwell), than its African-American protagonist, activist Ann Atwater (Taraji P. Henson); the movie demonstrates racial progress via its impact on him rather than her. His change is what matters, not her efforts at improving the world.

And yet, like Green Book before it, The Best of Enemies strikes a chord with regular audiences. You see it in the A from CinemaScore; you hear it in the appreciative murmurs from audiences as credits roll. In a way, The Best of Enemies is, for all its supposed stuffiness and stodginess, a rather perfect example of why we “go to the movies.” It’s a trip into a past—not a distant past, less than 50 years, but one that is increasingly unrecognizable—and an artful reminder of the possibilities of change.

This is the power of cinema, the ability to transport us into another place and time. Too often that power is used to send us to a world in which musclebound supermen battle it out via computer-generated fakery. Here, though, writer/director Robin Bissell sends us to the world of 1971, with its vintage cars and its outré racism. This is a world in which Klan members armed with shotguns feel comfortable shooting up a home because the woman who lives inside dates a black man; in which African-Americans are expected to send their kids to a school literally smoldering from a fire that has largely destroyed it. The costume design screams South, from Garland Keith’s (the great Nick Searcy) Colonel Sanders get-up to C.P.’s garage blues, unbuttoned just enough to give us a good glimpse of the dirty undershirt beneath.

The Best of Enemies concerns a “charrette,” a community meeting during which opposing sides come together to solve Durham’s segregation problems without heavy handed action from the courts. Bissell for the most part elides the specifics of the plans these activists and reactionaries argued for and against, choosing instead to show how the people on each side interacted and grew more comfortable with each other. He keeps the camera tight on Henson and Rockwell’s faces as the community debates, their eyes and mouths grimacing and contorting to help us see the invisible changes taking place within.

Those who would argue that The Best of Enemies falters because it’s yet another white savior movie are being a bit obtuse: Of course the Klan-leader-cum-desegregationist is at the heart of this story. He’s the one who has to change. If he doesn’t change, the world can’t either.

The Highwaymen

Frankly, The Best of Enemies—as competently shot and as passionately acted as it is—isn’t really my preferred destination when I’m going to the movies. The Highwaymen is more like it. Another jaunt into the past, this one more distant, The Highwaymen recounts Frank Hamer (Kevin Costner) and Maney Gault’s (Woody Harrelson) pursuit, and killing, of the murderous bank robbers Bonnie and Clyde (Emily Brobst and Edward Bossert, respectively).

Director John Lee Hancock seeks to deglamorize the killers, focusing not on their youthful faces or swaggering mien or charming chatter, but on Bonnie’s limp. The camera lingers on her leg, injured in an accident, as she drags it about between shootouts with the cops; we see her victims’ bloody faces far more frequently than her own, her beauty reflected only in the adoption of her hat and hair by the masses bewitched by her myth.

Instead of the Depression-era hoods, robbin’, Hancock focuses on the less glamorous Hamer and Gault. Texas Rangers forced into retirement after a progressive busybody took over the governor’s mansion and disbanded their legendary unit, the lawmen must take down the pair of murderers. Hamer is hesitant, having retired to a comfortable life with a well-off wife. It isn’t until he sees the killers lionized time and again in the newspapers that he decides something has to be done.

It’s that adoration that gets to Hamer, the grotesquerie of killers and armed thieves being celebrated because they gave some of their loot to locals and took from banks that had been declared enemies of the people. You see his frustration after a gas station attendant wishes the duo “all the luck to ’em,” since “they’re only taking from the banks, who are taking from the poor folks, like me.” Hamer gets back in his car and closes his suicide door, sitting there as the camera pushes in from the side to let us see both him and Gault. Hancock then cuts to a head-on view, isolating Costner, resting on him with a slightly jittery handheld shot that echoes the lawman hitting his boiling point.

He’s had enough, and the beating he puts on that gas station attendant may earn some chinwags from those who frown at the idea of cops getting information out of a guy with their fists. “There’s a peace officer who died in a puddle of himself back in Dallas,” Hamer says, choking the grease monkey in a headlock. “He was trying to get the shells out of his pockets when his head was blown off Easter Sunday morning. His family will be on the breadline next week. All luck to ’em? All luck to ’em?”

You can understand the grease monkey’s resentment, the frustration of the common people, given the world Hancock has transported us to. Like The Best of Enemies, The Highwaymen is a journey into our past and a reminder of how much things have changed. Poverty—real poverty, with hunger and dirt and fall-down-shacks-for-houses—is everywhere, shanties filled with roving migrants looking to earn pennies a day springing up by the sides of roads.

As James Lileks noted last week, the revulsion some critics feel toward Hancock’s film because it dares subvert a Boomer cinematic classic by showing killers to be killers is faintly embarrassing. The lingering fondness for Bonnie and Clyde, immortalized by the beauty of Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway all those years ago, isn’t shocking, I suppose. People go to the movies to be transported into different bodies as much as different times. We can’t be surprised when the images of beautiful killers resonate more than the grumpy old lawmen who ended their reign of terror. As much as America has changed over the last eighty-plus years, from the Depression to desegregation to détente to decline, some fads—like glamorizing murderous nutjobs—just never go out of style.

The post ‘The Best of Enemies,’ ‘The Highwaymen’ Reviews appeared first on Washington Free Beacon.

Washington Free Beacon

1. US Security from Michael_Novakhov (87 sites)

The Global Security News

Sites from Michael_Novakhov (21 sites)

Sites from Michael_Novakhov (21 sites): The Brooklyn Bridge: The Global Security News: 1. US Security from Michael_Novakhov (87 sites): Washington Free Beacon: ‘The Best of Enemies,’ ‘The Highwaymen’ Reviews

Why do we go to the movies? Strike that: Why do we use that locution, “to the movies”? Movie theaters are the physical locations to which we are going, after all. The phrasing itself is a bit anachronistic in the age of Netflix and Hulu and Prime and the Criterion Channel and Shudder and Vudu: the movies seem to come to us as much as we go to them.

Yet, go we do, even if we don’t go to movies like The Best of Enemies as much as we might have in years past. It’s a passé sort of picture, a liberal message movie about the ills of racism and the ways in which we can join together to improve our world. The theorists and the scolds do not care for it because it runs afoul of various sensibilities. The film seems more interested in its white protagonist, a Klan leader opposed to integration named C.P. Ellis (Sam Rockwell), than its African-American protagonist, activist Ann Atwater (Taraji P. Henson); the movie demonstrates racial progress via its impact on him rather than her. His change is what matters, not her efforts at improving the world.

And yet, like Green Book before it, The Best of Enemies strikes a chord with regular audiences. You see it in the A from CinemaScore; you hear it in the appreciative murmurs from audiences as credits roll. In a way, The Best of Enemies is, for all its supposed stuffiness and stodginess, a rather perfect example of why we “go to the movies.” It’s a trip into a past—not a distant past, less than 50 years, but one that is increasingly unrecognizable—and an artful reminder of the possibilities of change.

This is the power of cinema, the ability to transport us into another place and time. Too often that power is used to send us to a world in which musclebound supermen battle it out via computer-generated fakery. Here, though, writer/director Robin Bissell sends us to the world of 1971, with its vintage cars and its outré racism. This is a world in which Klan members armed with shotguns feel comfortable shooting up a home because the woman who lives inside dates a black man; in which African-Americans are expected to send their kids to a school literally smoldering from a fire that has largely destroyed it. The costume design screams South, from Garland Keith’s (the great Nick Searcy) Colonel Sanders get-up to C.P.’s garage blues, unbuttoned just enough to give us a good glimpse of the dirty undershirt beneath.

The Best of Enemies concerns a “charrette,” a community meeting during which opposing sides come together to solve Durham’s segregation problems without heavy handed action from the courts. Bissell for the most part elides the specifics of the plans these activists and reactionaries argued for and against, choosing instead to show how the people on each side interacted and grew more comfortable with each other. He keeps the camera tight on Henson and Rockwell’s faces as the community debates, their eyes and mouths grimacing and contorting to help us see the invisible changes taking place within.

Those who would argue that The Best of Enemies falters because it’s yet another white savior movie are being a bit obtuse: Of course the Klan-leader-cum-desegregationist is at the heart of this story. He’s the one who has to change. If he doesn’t change, the world can’t either.

The Highwaymen

Frankly, The Best of Enemies—as competently shot and as passionately acted as it is—isn’t really my preferred destination when I’m going to the movies. The Highwaymen is more like it. Another jaunt into the past, this one more distant, The Highwaymen recounts Frank Hamer (Kevin Costner) and Maney Gault’s (Woody Harrelson) pursuit, and killing, of the murderous bank robbers Bonnie and Clyde (Emily Brobst and Edward Bossert, respectively).

Director John Lee Hancock seeks to deglamorize the killers, focusing not on their youthful faces or swaggering mien or charming chatter, but on Bonnie’s limp. The camera lingers on her leg, injured in an accident, as she drags it about between shootouts with the cops; we see her victims’ bloody faces far more frequently than her own, her beauty reflected only in the adoption of her hat and hair by the masses bewitched by her myth.

Instead of the Depression-era hoods, robbin’, Hancock focuses on the less glamorous Hamer and Gault. Texas Rangers forced into retirement after a progressive busybody took over the governor’s mansion and disbanded their legendary unit, the lawmen must take down the pair of murderers. Hamer is hesitant, having retired to a comfortable life with a well-off wife. It isn’t until he sees the killers lionized time and again in the newspapers that he decides something has to be done.

It’s that adoration that gets to Hamer, the grotesquerie of killers and armed thieves being celebrated because they gave some of their loot to locals and took from banks that had been declared enemies of the people. You see his frustration after a gas station attendant wishes the duo “all the luck to ’em,” since “they’re only taking from the banks, who are taking from the poor folks, like me.” Hamer gets back in his car and closes his suicide door, sitting there as the camera pushes in from the side to let us see both him and Gault. Hancock then cuts to a head-on view, isolating Costner, resting on him with a slightly jittery handheld shot that echoes the lawman hitting his boiling point.

He’s had enough, and the beating he puts on that gas station attendant may earn some chinwags from those who frown at the idea of cops getting information out of a guy with their fists. “There’s a peace officer who died in a puddle of himself back in Dallas,” Hamer says, choking the grease monkey in a headlock. “He was trying to get the shells out of his pockets when his head was blown off Easter Sunday morning. His family will be on the breadline next week. All luck to ’em? All luck to ’em?”

You can understand the grease monkey’s resentment, the frustration of the common people, given the world Hancock has transported us to. Like The Best of Enemies, The Highwaymen is a journey into our past and a reminder of how much things have changed. Poverty—real poverty, with hunger and dirt and fall-down-shacks-for-houses—is everywhere, shanties filled with roving migrants looking to earn pennies a day springing up by the sides of roads.

As James Lileks noted last week, the revulsion some critics feel toward Hancock’s film because it dares subvert a Boomer cinematic classic by showing killers to be killers is faintly embarrassing. The lingering fondness for Bonnie and Clyde, immortalized by the beauty of Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway all those years ago, isn’t shocking, I suppose. People go to the movies to be transported into different bodies as much as different times. We can’t be surprised when the images of beautiful killers resonate more than the grumpy old lawmen who ended their reign of terror. As much as America has changed over the last eighty-plus years, from the Depression to desegregation to détente to decline, some fads—like glamorizing murderous nutjobs—just never go out of style.

The post ‘The Best of Enemies,’ ‘The Highwaymen’ Reviews appeared first on Washington Free Beacon.

Washington Free Beacon

1. US Security from Michael_Novakhov (87 sites)

The Global Security News

The Brooklyn Bridge

Sites from Michael_Novakhov (21 sites)

Sites from Michael_Novakhov (21 sites): The News and Times of Puerto Rico: “puerto rico politics” – Google News: MARCO RUBIO: Playing politics with disaster funding, Democrat obstruction hits new low – Holmes County Times Advertiser

MARCO RUBIO: Playing politics with disaster funding, Democrat obstruction hits new low  Holmes County Times Advertiser

Hurricane Michael made landfall on Florida’s Panhandle six months ago, destroying homes, communities, jobs, and the local economy. As Floridians try to piece …

“puerto rico politics” – Google News

The News and Times of Puerto Rico

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Sites from Michael_Novakhov (21 sites): The News and Times of Puerto Rico: “latino” – Google News: Cypress Hill Becomes 1st Latino Hip-Hop Group to Get a Star on the Walk of Fame – VladTV

Cypress Hill Becomes 1st Latino Hip-Hop Group to Get a Star on the Walk of Fame  VladTV

Southern California natives and hip-hop legends Cypress Hill have made history becoming the first hip-hop group to get a star on the Hollywood Walk…

“latino” – Google News

The News and Times of Puerto Rico

Sites from Michael_Novakhov (21 sites)

Sites from Michael_Novakhov (21 sites): The World News and Times: FOX News: Groom accused of sexual assault at wedding reception appears in court with wife: report

A lawyer for a New Jersey groom who allegedly groped an underage waitress at his own wedding reception last year has suggested a theory that proves his client is “an innocent man.”

FOX News

The World News and Times

Sites from Michael_Novakhov (21 sites)

The Global Security News: 1. World from Michael_Novakhov (22 sites): World – TIME: Dalai Lama Says He Feels ‘Almost Normal’ After Being Discharged From the Hospital

(NEW DELHI) — The Dalai Lama said he felt “normal, almost normal” as he left the New Delhi hospital where he had been treated for a chest infection.

The 83-year-old Tibetan spiritual leader looked pale but strong and spoke cheerfully to The Associated Press as he walked out of the building after being discharged Friday morning. He had been hospitalized on Tuesday after coming to the capital to consult with doctors.

He is likely to return this week to the north Indian hill town of Dharmsala that has been his headquarters since he fled Tibet in 1959 following a failed uprising against Chinese rule.

The Dalai Lama usually spends several months a year traveling the world to teach Buddhism and highlight the Tibetans’ struggle for greater freedom in China. But he has cut down on travel in the past year in order to take care of his health.

China doesn’t recognize the Tibetan government-in-exile and hasn’t held any dialogue with the representatives of the Dalai Lama since 2010. Beijing accuses him of seeking to separate Tibet from China.

The Dalai Lama denies being a separatist and says he merely advocates for substantial autonomy and protection of the region’s native Buddhist culture.

At an event with educators in Delhi earlier this month, the Dalai Lama said he is not seeking independence for Tibet, but rather a “reunion” with China under mutually acceptable terms.

In Tibetan Buddhist belief, the soul of its most senior lama is reincarnated into the body of a child, but China says its leaders have the right to choose a successor.

The Dalai Lama also predicted that the political impasse with China could change if he lived for at least another decade. But he said that if he died next year, “the Chinese government will seriously show reincarnation must (happen) in China.”

World – TIME

1. World from Michael_Novakhov (22 sites)

The Global Security News

Sites from Michael_Novakhov (21 sites): Russia News: KyivPost: Ukrainian culture takes center stage at London’s Chatham House

LONDON – Ukrainian culture boosted after the EuroMaidan Revolution, the popular uprising that drove President Viktor Yanukovych from power in 2014, including the creating of a Ukrainian Cultural Foundation. in Kyiv. Two of its experts came to London to discuss how culture helps Ukrainians to cope with the country’s instability, at an event in London’s Chatham House on April 10.

Ukrainian Cultural Foundation established by the Ministry of Culture in 2017 and attracted a lot of attention because of the generousness of the funding the organization received from the government and secondly because of the President’s wife Maryna Poroshenko willing to chair the supervisory board.

The organization’s budget in 2018 totaled $7.7 million and dramatically increased to $26.5 million in 2019.

First Lady Maryna Poroshenko got the position at the largest grant-making state-owned organization, dedicated to supporting cultural and art projects. However, despite society’s fear that she would make the organization biased and put it under the president’s patronage, that did not happen, said Oleksandra Yakubenko, international cooperation department’s head at the Ukrainian Cultural Fund.

“Even though the head of our supervisory board is Maryna Poroshenko, all the decisions are made by our executive director [Yuliia Fediv]. There is still a list of questions which the supervisory board decides on, such as financing projects with the budgets exceeding the amount of 150 minimum salaries,” explained Yakubenko. “Maryna Poroshenko chairs the board but every decision is made by a quorum,” she said.

The number of applications for funding has almost tripled since last year after the organization provided 298 projects with sponsorship. While in 2018 there was the only one overall program the project offered, now it has six options, including opportunities to produce innovative cultural products, organize training or debuts, do research, hold an event, shoot a film or create a piece of inclusive art. The latter program was developed in a partnership with the British Council in Ukraine, the United Kingdom’s international organization for cultural relations and educational opportunities, that opened its office in Kyiv 27 years ago.

“There is a growing interest in disability and Ukraine addressing disability. I am prompted by the fact that we now have disabled veterans who are very visible within society coming out of the conflict. So the level of discourse has grown around that,” said Simon Williams, head of British Council in Ukraine.

The demand for more cultural expression appeared in society due to the tragic events in Ukraine’s history, Yakubenko believes. According to her, the EuroMaidan Revolution, in which 100 demonstrators were killed, shifted Ukrainian culture.

“Ukrainians strive for ethical and cultural identification. Today people more freely express their pride in Ukrainian culture, arts and heritage,” she said. “Given the war, given the challenges and economic difficulties there is now a sense of Ukrainian identity, which is above ethnicity or language or beliefs or race or region,” agreed Williams. “Ironically, that is one of the results of the conflict and challenges that Ukrainians have come through but they are now more cohesive than ever.”

After the war started, the British Council focused on helping to keep education and cultural reforms on track in the war zone.

“So they are not derailed in the areas where conflict is going on,” said Williams.

The organization works with displaced universities that due to the war were forced to move out from their home cities in the Donbas region and relocate across the country.

“We are working with them to help re-establish themselves,” said Williams. “It is about building resilience to stress and some of that is about developing these media literacy skills within young people. But it is also working with English teachers. The teachers are really important figures of stability and respect within young people’s lives, but they themselves are in positions of great stress if you are talking about conflict communities.”

However, Williams said the organization has some challenges in delivering their help and support in the war-torn areas due to the British Foreign Commonwealth Office travel policy, which advises against travel to government-controlled areas of the Donbas. They do it remotely, but the bigger challenge is to help those in occupied territory.

“We have no mandate, and we cannot go there, but we know that there are young people there who need education opportunities in the same way. So how can we reach those?”

Supporting the creation of art is one of the most important focuses of the organization Williams runs: “This is a great example of that work. It is called SWAP and it is a residency program where Ukrainian artists take residence in the UK institutions. We do it in partnership with Liverpool Biennale.”

Anna Kakhiani, 27, from Kyiv, was among three artists from Ukraine who won the competition and went to Britain seeking inspiration for her project: “It was useful to look at people’s attitude to culture in another country. It was clear that their basic needs are satisfied and this issue does not even arise. So people do not think on whether they need culture, they just consume it by definition.”

British artists also traveled to Ukraine to explore local culture. At the program’s end, both British and Ukrainian artists presented their work in Odesa during an exhibition lasting from Feb. 22 to March 31.

“I did one project on the topic of the language barrier, which I actually faced myself when I came to Britain. That was a bit of self-irony. Another one was on the human being as a physical body and as a social unit. That was a performance – the word ‘fragile’ was tattooed on my back without using ink,” said Kakhiani.

The post Ukrainian culture takes center stage at London’s Chatham House appeared first on KyivPost.

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Sites from Michael_Novakhov (21 sites): Russia News: ПРАЙМ: Инвестор Калви попросил московский суд отпустить его под подписку о невыезде

Адвокаты защиты предложили суду залог в размере 5 миллионов рублей

ПРАЙМ

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Sites from Michael_Novakhov (21 sites): The World News and Times: FOX News: Oklahoma dad’s actions helped save daughter’s life after ‘sudden death’: report

An Oklahoma father’s quick thinking helped save his 6-year-old daughter’s life after the child suddenly collapsed when her heart stopped from a condition doctors call “sudden death,” a report said last week.

FOX News

The World News and Times

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Sites from Michael_Novakhov (21 sites): Russia News: Вести.Ru: Украина собирается отправить новые корабли в Керченский пролив

Украина продолжит отправлять корабли через Керченский пролив, заявил министр обороны Степан Полторак. По его словам, такие попытки будут возобновлены, когда ВМС страны будут к этому готовы и Киев получит полную поддержку партнеров.

Вести.Ru

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Sites from Michael_Novakhov (21 sites): Russia News: Lenta.ru : Новости: Таксист Лебедь оказался маньяком и получил пожизненный срок

Верховный суд Хакасии приговорил к пожизненному сроку бывшего таксиста Дмитрия Лебедя, который пять лет убивал и насиловал женщин. Он будет отбывать наказание в колонии особого режима. Маньяк орудовал по ночам с 2012 по 2017 год. Лебедь убил четырех, одна сумела спастись, восемь — изнасиловал.

Lenta.ru : Новости

Russia News

Sites from Michael_Novakhov (21 sites)